Report: Half of Chinese children have no playtime thanks to too much homework and extracurricular courses, over 70% of Chinese kids have own mobile phones and social accounts

 

Chinese Society  Updated:Sat, Jan 20, 2018 08:11 AM   By Bernd Chang

 

Extracurricular course,Little playtime

Blue paper shows Chinese children have very little playtime, 30% pupils averagely spend two hours in doing homework, the proportion is 54.6% for junior middle school students. Over 70% have own mobile phones and social accounts. 

New blue paper shows Chinese children spend too much of their spare time in doing homework and attending extracurricular courses, leading to little playtime, monotonous lifestyle and narrow social activities.

The blue paper, titled Social Participation of Chinese Children in 2017, was co-released by the Chinese Youth and Children Research Center (CYCRC) and Social Science Academic Press of China (SSAP), on Thursday in Beijing, Chinanews reported.

The two organizations sent out 8847 questionnaires to 87 public schools in 7 cities including Beijing, Wuxi, Anyang, Guiyang, Guangzhou, Harbin, Deyang)  and the surveyed questions covered participation of Chinese children in politics, school and nursery activities, after school activities, residential community activities, internet engagement, etc..

The survey shows that Chinese children's playtime is heavily encroached upon by homework and extracurricular classes, and they live a relatively monotonous life, and conduct narrow social activities.

According to the report, Chinese primary and middle school kids spend too much time doing homework. 30% pupils averagely spend two hours in doing homework,  the proportion is 54.6% for junior middle school students.

49.2% primary pupils attend at least one enrichment academic course after school which is closely related to major subjects they study in school, for junior middle school students the proportion is 51.7%, for senior middle school students it is 45.9%. And 25.3% kids attend more than two such extracurricular courses. In addition, around 20% of kids are enrolled in over two “classes of interest” (referring to courses less or not taught  in schools such as musical instruments, chess, calligraphy, art, etc..).

As a result of too much homework and extracurricular courses, more than half of Chinese primary and middle school students have nearly zero time to play with their mates. The proportion of those have no playtime is 54% for primary pupils, 61.4% for junior middle school students, and 66% for senior middle school students, respectively.

Researchers participating in the survey point out that it is understandable that study is the major task for the kids, but it is worrying that too much of kids’ spare time is encroached upon by extended after-school study, which is severely reducing kids’ participation in important social activities.

As an example, in terms of participation in family activities, Chinese parents care by far much more about academic study of their kids than anything else. 90% of Chinese parents talk about this topic at home with their children. In sharp contrast, 31.5% of Chinese parents never talk with their children about how to make friends, 38.6% never talk about what is love, 47.8% never talk about what is life, what is death. Educational experts point out that it is just these topics that play a more significant role in the healthy growing-up and self protection of the kids.

The blue paper also shows a great proportion of Chinese children are using internet. As high as 75.9% of primary and middle school kids have their own mobile phones, 85.5% of them have their own QQ account and 70.9% have Wechat account. However, most of them have little interest in news reporting, 28.8% of them never read online news.

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