Chinese Grammar Index

Chinese grammar index,Chinese Structure

The grammar of mandarin Chinese shares many features with other varieties of Chinese. The language almost entirely lacks inflection, so that words typically have only one grammatical form. Functions ...

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Chinese Grammar | Jun 15, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese grammar index

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Chapter 17: The Chinese passive

The structure of the Chinese passive: Mandarin Chinese has three passive marking prepositions (passive markers): 被bèi, 叫 jiào, and 让 ràng, all of which may be translated with the English ‘by.’ Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 14, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese passive

Chapter 16: Chinese conjunctions

Mandarin Chinese conjunctions include the following: 1, Conjunctions that indicate an ‘additive’ or ‘and’ relationship including 和, 跟, 同, 与; 2, Conjunctions that indicate a disjunctive or ‘or’ relationship including 还是, 或者. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 13, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese Conjunctions

Chapter 15: Chinese Adverbs

Adverbs are words that modify the verb or verb phrase. Chinese adverbs occur at the beginning of the verb phrase, before the verb and any prepositional phrase. This chapter presents adverbs that have logical functions. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 13, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese Adverbs

Chapter 14: Chinese prepositions and prepositional phrases

Here are the two rules to follow when using prepositions or prepositional phrases in Chinese. 1, the Chinese prepositional phrase occurs immediately before the verb phrase. 2, Nothing occurs between the preposition and its noun phrase object. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 12, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese Prepositions

Chapter 13: Chinese action verbs

This chapter shows you how to talk about completed, past, and ongoing actions, and introduces the overall properties of action verbs. There are two kinds of action verbs, those that describe open-ended actions, and those that describe actions that cause a change. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 11, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese action verbs

Chapter 12: Chinese modal verbs

Modal verbs occur before a verb and express the meanings of possibility, ability, permission, obligation, and prohibition. Chinese modal verbs include: 会, 能, 可以, 必须, 必得, 应当 Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 11, 2011 AM | Related:Modal verb

Chapter 11: Chinese Stative verbs

Stative verbs describe situations that do not involve action. Examples of Chinese stative verbs include 喜欢, 爱, 像, 想, 要, 怕, 尊敬, 感谢, 懂, 信, 想念, etc. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 9, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese stative verbs

Chapter 10: Chinese Adjectival verbs

Adjectival verbs translate into adjectives in English. Mandarin Chinese adjectival verbs, unlike English adjectives, are not preceded by a linking verb such as the verb 是 shì be. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 4, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese adjectival verbs

Chapter 9:Noun phrases in Chinese

In this chapter, we refer to the noun that is being described or modified as the head noun and to the words or phrases that describe or modify the head noun as the modifier. In Chinese, all noun modifiers occur before the head noun. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 3, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese noun phrases

Chapter 8: Chinese Classifiers

A classifier is a word that occurs between the specifier and/or number and the noun. In Chinese, all nouns occur with classifiers when they are preceded by a specifier and/or number. And all Chinese classifiers occur between a specifier or number and a noun. Read More

Chinese Grammar | Jun 1, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese classifiers

Chapter 7:Specifiers and demonstratives in Chinese

这zhè and 那nà have two functions: used as Chinese demonstratives, or words that are used to point out an item; and used as Chinese specifiers, or words that occur as part of a noun phrase and that identify specific items: Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 29, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese specifiers

Chapter 6:Chinese numbers (2)

In this section we present Chinese numbers include fractions, percentages, decimals, half, multiples, lucky and unlucky Chinese numbers, numbers used in phrases and expressions, and special usage of some Chinese numbers. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 28, 2011 PM | Related:Chinese numbers

Chapter 6:Chinese numbers (1)

In this section we present Chinese numbers include 0-99 and higher, formal characters for Chinese numbers, Chinese ordinal numbers, and estimates and approximations numbers. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 26, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese numbers

Chapter 5:Chinese Nouns

In this chapter we introduce Chinese nouns including common Chinese nouns, Chinese pronouns and reflexive pronoun 自己, inclusive pronoun, possession involving pronouns and Chinese proper nouns. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 23, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese nouns

Chapter 4:Phrase order in the Chinese sentence

The basic phrase order of the Chinese sentence is topic + subject + predicate. Chinese prepositional phrases always occur right before the verb and its objects: subject + prepositional phrase + verb + direct object Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 21, 2011 PM | Related:Chinese Phrase order

Chapter 3:The Chinese writing system:an overview

In this chapter we present an overview of Chinese writing system. All Chinese characters contain a radical, a sequence of strokes. The classification of Chinese characters identifies six categories based on structure and representation of meaning. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 21, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese writing system

Chapter 2:Chinese Syllable, meaning, and word (3)

This section presents the strategies that Chinese incorporates foreign words and naming foreign objects. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 19, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese syllables

Chapter 2:Chinese syllable, meaning, and word (2)

One of the features of Chinese is that each syllable is associated with a meaning. Word-specific tone changes in Chinese: there are certain tone changes that occur in specific Chinese words. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 19, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese syllables

Chapter 2:Chinese Syllable, meaning, and word (1)

One of the features of Chinese is that each syllable is associated with a meaning. The most common length of Mandarin words is two syllables, and a number of common word formation strategies exist which help to create and maintain the two syllable word. Read More

Chinese Grammar | May 19, 2011 AM | Related:Chinese syllables

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